Monthly Archives: February 2012

Handprint Calendar.

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Activity:

I did something like this when I was in kindergarten. We made t-shirts, and did one design every month we were in school. Although, we did not use our hands, my teacher had different stamps. This is a fun way to teach the different months to students. The only thing to this activity is you will have to watch what children are in your class. Having a diverse class is more common now than it ever was, and some of these children do not celebrate the holidays you would think to put on there.

Materials Needed:

T-shirt or Pre-made Calender Book (whichever way you decide to go)

Paints

Stencils for shapes that are not hands (if I were teaching, I would just add the small detail before or after depending on the month)

Directions:

For this activity, it might be nice to have an “Upper Level Buddy” so we do not get paint all over the classroom. Find shape you want to use for that specific month, do a demonstration. This way the students know what they should be doing. On ones like the pumpkin, add the the mouth and eyes after the paint drys. Have fun with this. The students will love to have something they made to share with their friends and family.

Found At:

http://eisforexplore.blogspot.com/2011/12/handprint-calendar.html

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How Tall is Your Snowman?

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Activity:

This activity contains art, the student will be painting a snowman. Then incorporating math by finding out how tall their snowman is in cubes. This activity will take a few class periods. I would set aside roughly 30 minutes for the making of the snowman, including clean up time. The next day, or so, have the students cut our their snow man and glue it on to a piece of construction paper with the note. The students can then stack up cubes and figure out how tall their snowman is, and enter it in the space provided. This part of the activity should take around 20 minutes for the students to finish. To add something extra to it, you could have the students compare how tall their snowman is to other students. If you do this, make sure to tell the students their cubes are not for sword fighting.

Materials Needed:

Construction Paper

Paint

Scissors

Cubes

Pre-printed Note – “My snowman is ________ cubes tall.”

Glue sticks

Directions:

Paint the snowman onto a piece of construction paper. When that is dry, cut out the snowman and glue it to a different piece of construction paper (another option is to leave it on the same piece of paper, just leave room for the note). Have the students figure out how many cubes tall their snowman is. Then have them write the number in the space provided.

Appropriate Age Level:

This activity is a great hands on activity for Kindergarteners or 1st Graders. It gets them counting, while at the same time doing something fun.

Found At:

http://mrsleeskinderkids.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2011-02-03T21%3A25%3A00-06%3A00&max-results=10

Matching Game.

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Activity:

What a fun way to recognize upper and lower case letters. This is a matching activity, if that wasn’t obvious. The students will be able to start identifying that “G” is the ice cream scoop that goes with the “g” cone.

Materials Needed:

Construction Paper – colorful for ice cream and brown for the cones

Scissors

Marker

Velcro

Laminating Machine (optional)

Directions:

Cut out the ice cream scoops from the colorful paper and cones from the brown paper. Decorate with other makers or crayons if you would like. If you are planning on creating this matching came to be reusable, at home or in a classroom, I would recommend laminating them for a little extra protection. After laminating add a small piece of brown velcro to the front of the wide end of the cone and on the back of the bottom of the ice cream scoop. And now, you have a matching game for the ABCs!

Appropriate Age Level:

This activity, as explained, is definitely for 1st grade and below. You could very easily make a math game out of this for older grades. You could also put a picture on one side and the word on their other. This is a very easy activity to change around a little bit.

Found at:

http://littlepageturners.blogspot.com/2011/07/abc-scoops.html

Counting with Beads.

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Activity:

Visual Counting with beads. There are different numbers on each pipe cleaner, this number indicates how many beads the students are supposed to have. A teacher could also bring ideas of color coded beads to each number (i.e. Use green beads with number 1, 3, and 5 – Use read beads with number 12, etc.).

Materials Needed if counting to 20:

1 – Scissors

1 – Glue Stick

15 – Pipe Cleaners

20 – 2×1 inch pieces of construction paper

A good sized handful of beads (at least enough to fill each pipe cleaner)

1 – Bowl or container

Directions:

Use the scissors to cut the construction paper into 2×1 inch pieces and the pipe cleaners in half. After cutting, fold each piece in half and write the number on each side. Once each piece is numbered, cover the inside with glue. Place a half piece of a pipe cleaner on glue to make a flag, so to speak. Continue until all number flags are put together. When glue has had time to set, put beads in the bowl and start counting.

Appropriate Age Level:

This activity could be used for multiple grade levels. If you are working with beginner counters I would suggest maybe only going to ten, maybe 15. You could also do addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division on these to make it useable for older levels.

*When/if using with young children, make sure to watch carefully. We do not want anyone choking on a bead or two.

*Also, explain that the beads are not to be throw at anything or anyone.

Ready for some in class ativities?

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My name is Bridget. I am in school to become an Integrated Elementary and Special Education teacher. For a few different classes of mine we are expected to create our own lesson plans. I believe no less is going to be fun for the students unless there is an activity involved. So, as you are probably guessing, I am going to post about different activities I think elementary age students would really enjoy. Just remember, you can always tweak things I write to work better for your classroom! I hope you enjoy and find use in what I find!