Monthly Archives: March 2012

Diversity Lesson.

Standard

Activity:

This is a diversity activity. It will show the students that besides the color of your skin, people are the same. We all came into this world in the same, but that is for a different day. 🙂 This activity would be great while talking about Martin Luther King Jr. It proves exactly what he was getting at during his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963.

Materials Needed:

1 White Egg

1 Brown Egg

1 Paper Plate

Directions:

Talk to your students, children, or campers, tell them about diversity and that it is okay to have different color skin. It is okay to be friends with people who do not look anything like you, everyone needs friends, yada, yada, yada. Show them the eggs and ask them what the differences and similarities are between the them. The only obvious big one will be the color. Turn around, or go to a part of the room where the children cannot see you, crack the eggs open on the paper plate. Go back to your students and ask which one is which. OH MY GOSH, you cannot tell. Proving everyone is the same on the inside, with different color outsides.

You could also do this with M&Ms, Skittles, or even Tootsie Pops. Anything that has the same inside, but different colored outsides.

Appropriate Age Level:

Honestly, you could probably do this activity with anyone. I think it would make the most impact in the middle level students (2nd – 4th grades). But, no matter who you show this too it should make some sort of indent in their mindset.

Found At:

http://thefirstgradeparade.blogspot.com/search/label/place%20value

Popsicle Stick Puzzle.

Standard

(Sorry for the pixely picture!)

Activity:

Make your own puzzle! You can have your students make puzzles having to do with the unit you are working on (i.e. if you are doing a unit on fish have them make a puzzle about fish). When the students are done, you can have them switch and put their classmates puzzles together. This activity would also work really well with pictures, possibly ones the students were able to take.

Materials Needed:

Popsicle Sticks – 10-15 for each student

Pencils

Markers or Crayons

Masking Tape

Rubber Bands – enough for each student

Directions:

Lay the popsicle sticks right up against each other on a desk or table and put a piece, or two, of masking tape going the opposite way of the sticks. Flip over, so the tape is not in the way, start sketching out the picture with your pencil. Trace and color in your picture, take off the tape and you have a homemade puzzle. To keep each puzzle together wrap it up with a rubber band to keep organized.

Appropriate Age Level:

I think this specific activity would work really well with the lower and middle elementary levels. I feel they would enjoy making and putting together. I may be fun to work with another class on this, and switch one class’ puzzles for the others.

Found at:

http://cuegly.blogspot.com/2011/09/75-kid-activities.html

Calm Down Jar.

Standard

 

Activity:

All students have a hard time concentrating at some point in time during their time in school. The Calm Down Jar is a perfect way to give your students or children a couple minutes to themselves to not think about anything but glitter falling. Not only do they get to waste some energy on vigorously shaking The Calm Down Jar and letting their cares slip away while watching the glitter float to the bottom of the jar. You could even get mini-mason jars so the students could each have one to bring home.

Materials Needed:

One Mason Jar with Lid

One Tablespoon of Glitter Glue PER One Cup of Hot Water

Extra Glitter (a small carton should do).

Directions:

Figure out how many cups of what will fit into your mason jar, heat them up. Add one tablespoon of glitter glue for every cup of hot water you will be putting in your mason jar. Then add the extra glitter, put the lid on and swirl together. I might suggest super gluing the lid to the jar, just to be safe.

Appropriate Age Level:

I feel that this would work for any level of student. It could even work for us college students and all of you parents who just need to take a second to breath and forget about everything.

Found At:

http://chasingthefirefly.wordpress.com/2011/09/13/free-your-mind/

Milk Jug Bird Feeder.

Standard

Activity:

Spring is coming! Birds are here, let’s give them somewhere to make their home! Through this activity we will be making a bird house using a recycled milk jug! This would be an awesome project to do if you are doing a unit on birds! This way the will bring home what they learn in class. You can take your students on a bird watch hike to get some of the materials, such as sticks and leaves. While on the hike, you can have your students do a scavenger hunt of different birds they will find in your area. You can also just do this as a fun family project for the back yard.

Materials Needed:

Scissors – adult will need to do the cutting if you are doing this project with younger children

Hole Punch – optional

Gallon Milk Jug – can have the students each bring one

Paint Brush – enough for everyone, or you can talk about sharing

Green Acrylic Paint – other colors can be used if you prefer

Sticks – a lot, enough for every roof and a perch (can find if you decide to do the hike)

Hot Glue or Adhesive – Elmer’s Glue should work just fine as well

Old Metal Hangers – can have the students each bring one

Directions:

First you will have to make a big hole a little below the middle of the milk jug with the scissors, again have an adult cut this hole. Then take the hole punch and make a hole right below the larger one. Next, paint the milk jug with the acrylic paint. Once the paint has dried, punch the two holes on top of the milk jug to attach the hanger. Glue the sticks to the “roof” of the bird house and a few around the sides. Attach the perch, and put out in your back or front yard to enjoy.

Appropriate Age Level:

This activity could go with a variety of different ages, heck I might make this for my dad for father’s day and I am 20 years old. I would recommend if you are going to do this with a class of lower level students, have a sixth grade buddy (or a different upper level grade) help out with the project. You could also have upper level students do this for Earth Day (which is coming up soon)!

Found At:

http://www.nwf.org/Kids/Ranger-Rick/Activities/Crafts/Birds/Milk-Jug-Bird-Feeder.aspx

Jellyfishing. Jellyfishing. Jellyfishing.

Standard

Activity:

For this activity you could be doing a unit on jellyfish, or just simply be interested in jellyfish. It does not necessarily need to be a classroom project, you can just make them to decorate your classroom. They are fun and colorful, and students would love them.

Materials Needed:

Small Paper Bowls – one for every jellyfish you are planning on making

Watercolor Paints

Watercolor Paint brushes

White and Black Paper

Scissors

Liquid Adhesive , Hot Glue, or Elmer’s Glue – your choice

Fishing Line

Ribbon – as many different kinds as you would like

Directions:

Paint the bottom of the bowl with the watercolor paint. Then, cut out the eyes, whatever size you would like, and glue them onto the front of the jellyfish (you can also draw them on with makers). Glue the ribbon to the part of the bowl you have painted (you can stick to using the same color scheme, or have multicolored tentacles). When the the glue has dried, poke two small holes into the top of the bowl to thread the fish line through. Make sure to have the fish line loop underneath the bowl, tie more ribbon to the loop. Now you have cute little jellyfish to add to your lesson.

Appropriate Age Level:

If you are going to have everyone in your classroom make a jellyfish, I would keep this activity to the upper levels (unless you are doing this with “buddies”). Definitely do not use hot glue if you are working with the lower levels.

Found At:

http://www.scrapbooksetc.com/blogs/iscrapuscrap/2011/06/15/how-to-make-your-own-jellyfish/

Spaceman.

Standard

     

Activity:

When your child or student is learning how to write, they may have trouble with spacing. When I was learning how to write, I was told to put my pinky finger in for appropriate spacing. This way, you can do a unit or just a lesson plan on space, astronauts, etc. and incorporate a writing activity with it, give each student a “spaceman” space maker.

Materials Needed:

Popsicle sticks (enough for your students)

Small pictures of astronauts, no more than an inch wide (picture above)

Laminator machine – optional

Scissors

Glue (hot glue or Elmer’s glue)

Directions:

Print out the pictures of the astronauts. Laminate the entire page before cutting them apart (optional, but will last longer this way).
After cutting out the spacemen and women, glue them to the popsicle sticks. And presto, you have a space maker for those beginning writers.

Appropriate Age Level:

I feel most students start learning how to write sentences and phrases around 1st grade. Obviously, these space makers are not needed for the upper grades.

Found At:

http://lovehugsandladybugs.blogspot.com/search/label/freebies